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Jan Migenda

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Jan Migenda

Premium Member

Current city:
Solingen
City of birth:
Düsseldorf
Host university:
UCSC-MILAN
Home university:
BUW

Jan activity

  • Blog

    Tiryns

    Still on the Peloponnes, we found a forgotten centre of Mycenean culture: Tiryns! A ring fortress on a hill, the thick walls show the former importance of the place: It was larger than the Acropolis of Athens! At the very top lies a sacred place with a small path...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 9 days ago
  • Blog

    Nafplio

    Continuing our trip through the Peloponnes, we also saw Nafplio (Navplion), a small town which was more important only in Byzantine times and in 1825 when the first Greek Parlament convened there. Near the coast, I could take one of my best photos ever from the entire...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Navplion, 9 days ago
  • Blog

    Epidauros Museum

    The museum in Epidauros gave us some more insight into how the ancient priests/doctors worked and what they used to treat the patients. This relief shows the treatment of a wounded arm and a patient laying down while a snake (a symbol of the god) snuggles up to him...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 10 days ago
  • Blog

    Epidauros

    Epidauros is a UNESCO world heritage site on the Peloponnes. It is famous as a sanctuary to Asklepios, the god of healing. The archeological site shows the following buildings: The gymnasion (sports complex) was used for therapeutical purposes. In its centre stands a...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 10 days ago
  • Blog

    Nemea Museum

    Nemea not only had the temple and stadium from my last post, but also a small museum honouring the games. This awesome speech/quote was to be found near the entrance, clearly visible for every visitor. These archaic figurines in clay represent women, one of them with...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, one month ago
  • Blog

    Lerna + Nemea

    As you might already know, Greece is full of ancient legends. Sometimes they explain great events of history ... ana example can be found here: Lerna is a place where a palace from the Early Helladic Period, the so-called "House of Tiles", stands. Also, there have been...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, one month ago
  • Blog

    Sparta

    Finally ... THIS. IS. SPARTAAAA! Yes, we arrived in this former military centre of Greece which played an extremely important role during the Persian invasions. Lykourgos counts as a famous commander, and also the rigorous physical education is still famous, as many...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Sparta, one month ago
  • Blog

    Mystras 2

    In many churches of Mystras, there were Byzantine frescoes with stories of saints depicted in vivid colours, unfortunately a bit bleached over time, but hey, who are we to complain about such works of art? The churches had a clearly Orthodox style with round arches;...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, one month ago
  • Blog

    Mystras

    So we were on our way to Sparta when we passed a ruined city with the remains of a great castle on a hilltop: Mystras. Climbing the hill was a bit of work, but the view over the landscape was rewarding, as you can see! The story of the castle begins in the early 13th...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, one month ago
  • Blog

    Messene Museum

    Just as if we had not already seen enough musea, we also had to enter the Archeological Museum of Messene. Actually, every museum shows something new, so no time is wasted on repeating stuff! First, there were some elaborate flint arrowheads on display ... we may label...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, one month ago
  • Blog

    Bassae and Messene

    After seeing so many artifacts, marble inscriptions and statues of Zeus, Venus and Augustus et cetera it was time to go outside again: We saw the Temple of Apollon in Bassae, UNESCO world heritage site, and arrived in Messene. The thick city walls defended the city in...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, one month ago
  • Blog

    Olympia Museum 2: Highlights

    This is the second part of the Archeological Museum of Olympia! A rare find enriches the collection: The helmet of Miltiades! (It is signed hence we know it is this one.) Miltiades was a famous well-educated general who played a crucial role in beating the Persians at...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Olimpia, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Olympia Museum

    Besides the temples and the famous stadium, Olympia also has a museum which we saw (of course). These small horse figures made from clay, bronze or iron were votive gifts to make the preferred party win. Over all the years, many of them were accumulated. Here, another...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Olimpia, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Olympia 2

    The areal of Olympia is actually quite big: The gymnasion, palestra and many temples cover much space. You see the remains of the columns ... what's missing is also the roof and the paint. The most famous temple in Olympia, the Temple of Zeus, hosted a statue of Zeus...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Olimpia, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Olympia

    We left the sacred site of Delphi for Olympia, not without seeing something less sacred in town: These condoms with 3D imprints of original ancient erotic scenes found on ceramics. A great souvenir ... with something similar, I won the "best/worst souvenir contest" our...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Olimpia, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Delphi Museum 2: Marble and Music!

    The second part of the museum contained lots of marble in the form of inscriptions and statues. Check it out! This inscription is written in Latin, but it's not classical Latin. It's from the Hellenistic Period or Late Antiquity as the dedicator's name L. Aimilius is...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Delphi Museum 1

    The Archeological Museum in Delphi offers some mixed findings from the site. Be curious and explore! Here, votive weapons and bronze infantry helmets in the Corinthian style are to be found in the section about warfare. Someone took this photo of me (with bad posture)...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Delphi: Theatre and Stadium

    Finally, Delphi was not only a religious, but also a cultural centre! Read and marvel! The theatre of Delphi was home to the first Pythic Games which consisted in singing along to a kithara. They were held every eight, later every four years. Think of it as an ancient...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Delphi: The Temple of Apollon

    Delphi not only had the famous oracle I wrote about in my last post, but also a sacred site with many temples. I will now introduce them to you: The Hall of the Athenians was built after the wars against the Persians to store the spoils of war inside. It was built like...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Delphi: The Centre of the World and the Oracle

    Delphi was considered to be the centre of the world in Ancient Greece. How come? This oval stone (unfortunately a bit broken over time) is the Omphalos, the navel of the world (or at least a copy of it). According to legend, it fell down from the sky as a meteor after...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Delphi: Introduction

    Delphi - a famous place. It even has a programming language named after it (we learned to use it in school). After a short trip by bus, we arrived in the small village nearby, made our way past overpriced souvenir shops (40€ for a SD card for a camera!) and came to...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Boeotia

    Time to take a break from the cloister as the weather was really nice. The final view from the restaurant in the sunset showed us some hills, trees and the sea in the distance ... meanwhile, we had a Greek salad (of course)! Look at this lovely sunset over Mount...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Curiosities at Hosios Loukas

    This is the last post from the monastery, I promise! There were just some curiosities that I think you would need to see: Sometimes it's the little things that you normally overlook walking by: This platoon of ants carrying a large breadcrumb seems insignificant next...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Osios Loukas Monastery - The Crypt

    If you go downstairs, you will see the richly decorated crypt of the monastery: With its wide vault and floral as well as geometrical motives, it is surely an inspiring place, even if it may be a bit dark. This is the gravestone (taphos) of the holy man Loukas, though...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago
  • Blog

    Inside Osios Loukas Monastery

    Entering the monastery through the main entrance, you see the main nave flooded with light: Up high, you see the figure of Christ surrounded by angels and Biblical scenes in the corners, all in golden mosaics. A smaller nave behind the main one is plain, with only...

    0 by Jan in Erasmus blog Greece, 2 months ago

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